Can History be Open Source? Wikipedia and the Future of the Past

Can History be Open Source? Wikipedia and the Future of the Past, by Roy Rosenzweig, originally published in The Journal of American History Volume 93, Number 1 (June, 2006): 117-46, and republished on the web by The Center for History and New Media. This article discusses Wikipedia from an historian’s point of view, and provides … Read more Can History be Open Source? Wikipedia and the Future of the Past

Ann Sparanese’s letter to the Times-Picayune

The New Orleans Times Picayune published an article on Sunday about Madeleine Albright’s appearance at the ALA Conference. The article was focused on Albright’s comments about the Cuban “independent librarians,” which really only amounted to a couple of sentences, and provided background on the situation from an anti-Castro perspective. Clearly Robert Kent got to the … Read more Ann Sparanese’s letter to the Times-Picayune

if:Book – Google and the myth of universal knowledge: a view from Europe

Interesting post in if:Book, about the new book coming out in France, Quand Google d?ɬ©fie l’Europe : plaidoyer pour un sursaut, by Jean-No?ɬ´l Jeanneney. Jeanneny, who is the director of the French National Library, is one of the most prominent critics of the Google Book project, and is worried about the project leading to an … Read more if:Book – Google and the myth of universal knowledge: a view from Europe

Flooded and Forgotten

Here is an article in Salon by novelist Susan Straight, reflecting on the situation in New Orleans after her appearance at the conference. I think most of us who were there for the conference share her feelings and made some of the same observations. “Louisiana is still devastated, and its people — black and white, … Read more Flooded and Forgotten